The Kent Mental Health & Wellbeing Index is out!

The Kent Mental Health & Wellbeing Index is out! constructed from 70 measures of a wide range of individual, household and area aspects of wellbeing.  It has been constructed at Ward-level, and provides an assessment of the relative assets and vulnerabilities of an area in respect of the mental health and wellbeing of the population within it. It has a range of applications including assessing need, providing of focus for preventative action and supporting strategic decision making with regard to service provision.   The accompanying technical report (PDF, 2.2 MB) provides a detailed description of the approach, the framework used, the indicators selected and the construction of the final index

Kent Council

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Stay Alive: Grassroots Suicide Prevention App

Stay Alive is a suicide prevention app which offers help and support both to people with thoughts of suicide and to people concerned about someone else. The app can be personalised to tailor it to the user.

Key features include:

  • Quick access to national crisis support helplines
  • A mini-safety plan that can be filled out by a person considering suicide
  • A Life Box to which the user can uploads photos from their phone reminding them of their reasons to stay alive
  • Strategies for staying safe from suicide
  • How to help a person thinking about suicide
  • Suicide myth-busting
  • Research-based reasons for living
  • Online support services and other helpful apps
  • Suicide bereavement resources
  • Click here to link to more information on the Grassroots website.#Stay Alive 

     

AIMH 20th birthday celebratory conference 2016

The Association for Infant Mental Health (UK)’s 20th Birthday Celebratory Conference will be a great opportunity to think about the work achieved to date, reflect on the last 20 years and focus on infant mental health needs in the future. The event will offer excellent networking opportunities and includes a host of highly respected guest speakers

Radcliffe Conference Centre, Warwick University Campus Friday 30th September 2016. 10am – 4.30pm   AIMH (UK) Members £65.00, Non AIMH (UK) members £75.00 Stands £150.00 (includes one conference place)    Expressions of interest to: info@aimh.org.uk

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Health Matters: Getting every adult active every day

One in four women and one in five men in England are physically inactive, doing less than 30 minutes moderate physical activity a week- says Health Matters

The guidelines recommend muscle strengthening activities twice a week, but only 34% of men and 24% of women are achieving this.

So why are so many adults struggling to be physically active?  Many people equate physical activity to sweaty gym sessions, and are put off by this, and do not realise that moderate physical activity can be achieved through everyday life through activities such as:

  • brisk walking
  • dancing
  • cycling
  • gardening

As long as the activity causes you to get warmer and breathe harder and for your heart to beat faster then it counts as moderate physical activity. Any physical activity is better than none. As little as 10 minutes of moderate physical activity at a time provides numerous health benefits.  Physical activity can help to prevent and manage over 20 chronic conditions and diseases, including some cancers, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and depression.

Persuading inactive people  to become more active could prevent one in ten cases of stroke and heart disease in the UK and one in six deaths from any cause. In fact it’s often said that if physical activity was a drug it would be classed as a wonder drug.

That’s why the latest strategy from Sport England focuses, for the first time, on encouraging inactive and underrepresented groups to become more active. This is where the greatest individual, community and economic gains can be made.

This edition of Health Matters adopts PHE’s national physical activity framework, Everybody Active Every Day, which identifies four areas for local and national action that can help to get people active.

  1. Active Society – People are more likely to be active if it is seen as ‘normal’, and if their friends and peers are also active.
  2. Moving professionals – 1 in 4 patients would be more active if advised by a GP or nurse.
  3. Active environments – Our homes, workplaces and local environments should be designed to encourage physically active.
  4. Moving at scale – Positive change needs to happen at every level, in every region and be measurable.

Read the physical activity edition of Health Matters for more on what local authorities and health professionals can do to get the nation active

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Building Bridges, Breaking Barriers – new CQC report on the state of integrated care for older people

The Health and care regulator for England, the Care Quality Commission’s published a report on the state of integrated care for older people in England-  Building bridges, Breaking Barriers”    The report looks at how different health and care services work together to support the needs of older people in England. It warns that despite a widespread commitment for integration across the sectors, progress is needed to better support people who use a number of services, reduce hospital admissions and avoid confusion about where to go for help. building-bridges

Twelve of Lambeth’s parks and open spaces among the very best in Britain

Twelve individual parks and open spaces in Lambeth, including Brockwell Park, Kennington Park and West Norwood Cemetery, which is one of London’s ‘Magnificent Seven’ Victorian-era cemeteries, are among the very best in the UK. They’re included in a record-breaking list of 1,686 parks and green spaces to receive an esteemed Green Flag Award – the mark of a quality park or green space. Read more about our prestigious parks. Let’s visit them.

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Implementing the Five Year Forward View

‘Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health’ was published 20th July. It details the improvements people will see on the ground as  the independent Mental Health Taskforce’s recommendations are implemented.

Intended as a blueprint for the changes that the NHS needs to make to improve mental health, the plan sets out what the public and people who use services  can expect from the NHS, and when.

The report outlines how new funding, pledged in response to the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health, will be made available for Clinical Commissioning Groups year on year. It also shows how the workforce requirements will be delivered in each priority area and outlines how data, payment and other system levers will support transparency.

the European Social Survey – Looking through the wellbeing kaleidoscope.

The report is the culmination of a year-long project led by the Centre for Comparative Social Surveys at City University London, working alongside the New Economics Foundation, and the Wellbeing Institute at the University of Cambridge.

Whilst much useful wellbeing research has relied upon life satisfaction as an overall measure of wellbeing –  this project took advantage of the richness of the European Social Survey, which has now included two specific modules on wellbeing, to explore its multi-dimensionality.

Here are eight of the most interesting things you’ll find in the report:

  • Results for a new comprehensive psychological wellbeing measure. It incorporates ten different aspects of wellbeing – competence, emotional stability, engagement, meaning, optimism, positive emotion, positive relationships, resilience, self-esteem, and vitality.
  • The UK ranks second from bottom in terms of sense of vitality. As well as the overall comprehensive score, the report explores how different elements of wellbeing vary between countries. For example.  The UK relatively well in terms of optimism (8th out of 21 countries),  but not so well in terms of vitality or positive relationships (16th out of 21).
  • There are often large differences in wellbeing between population groups, but they are not inevitable. Although those of an ethnic minority, on low incomes or with low education often have lower average wellbeing, this is not always the case, with some countries showing almost no difference. This suggests that policy could aim to reduce or eliminate these inequalities.
  • Unemployment rates and governance are the key determinants of wellbeing inequalities.Not only is unemployment and poor governance bad for average wellbeing, but they are further associated with inequalities in wellbeing.
  • People in the UK how low levels of participation in the five ways to wellbeing, compared to peer countries such as France and Germany. The five ways to wellbeing are a set of actions that evidence suggests promote wellbeing. They are: Connect, Be Active, Take Notice, Keep Learning, and Give.  With the exception of those aged 65 and over, the UK generally had low levels of participation in the five ways,
  • Young women (15 – 24), parents, and people doing housework or childcare in the UK reported very low rates on Take Notice (whether people take notice and appreciate their surroundings). This finding was not replicated across Europe, suggesting there may be particular barriers in the UK for these population groups which may be amenable to policy.
  • The more marginalised groups in society – women, those who claim membership of a discriminated group, and those with lower education – have a lower level of perceived quality of society. This is measured in terms of assessments of the key institutions in society: trust in the police, politicians, parliament and legal institutions, and satisfaction with public services, government, the economy, and democracy. Those in middle aged groups (25 to 64) also have more negative views. This suggests that our democratic and legal institutions may need to do more to engage with these groups.
  • There are marked regional inequalities in perceived quality of society within the UK, with London and the South East having high levels of economic and governmental satisfaction compared to other regions, particularly the Midlands.